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Siberian Husky

Siberian Husky

The Siberian Husky is one of the most popular
Dog Breeds
in America. They are a beautiful breed with a thick coat that comes in a multitude of colors and markings. They originated in Siberia and are known for their beautiful blue eyes. Their wolf-like looks can draw you in, but this is an extremely athletic and intelligent dog that can be a bit of a challenge for first-time dog owners. They were bred to
pull and are not great for sitting around!

Here are some links to some pages that you might be interested in on the puppy-pictures site:

Siberian Husky Puppies

Siberian Husky Breeders

Siberian Husky Puppies for Sale

Siberian Husky Overview

This beautiful breed was originally developed by the seminomadic Chukchi people of Northeastern Asia to pull sleds over long distances. You might now know this, but the original Iditarod came from a life-saving diphtheria serum run via sled-dogs to remote Nome, Alaska, in January 1925. This route was later recreated as a race, now known as the Iditarod. After this initial serum run from Anchorage to Nome, some of the sled dogs were taken on a tour of the Lower 48. They were of course met with quite the fan-fare. From that day on, the Siberian has been popular.
If you are looking for a companion dog that is going to lay on the couch with you and go for a leisurely weekend walk, this isn’t the dog for you. This guy needs exercise and is going to need to be kept moving. They can also be rather strong-headed and are not the most devoted companions.
If you or your family are the type of person that wants to get outside every day and strive on vigorous exercise, then this might be a good fit for you. The husky is a very loving breed that will meet your guests with love and typically gets along well with other dogs.
They do typically get along well with other dogs, but they might not get along that well with your cats and other small animals as they have a very strong prey drive. If you have more than one species of pet you might want to proceed with caution when getting this breed.
These guys shed A LOT! They are very similar to the German Shepherd in this regards. They were bred to live in the snow but shed the most in spring and fall. The good news is that frequent brushing will help their shedding hair.
While they are not very vocal dogs in terms of barking, they do often howl, especially when a siren is near. Siberians are not usually barkers, although they’ll often howl, especially to a siren. For some reason they have a desire to wander and are known as quite the escape artists.
Like all
Dog Breeds, they should not just be relegated to the backyard. They should be kept inside with the family. They will turn destructive if kept alone and bored for too long.
Siberians aren’t known for their protective nature either. They don’t make the best watch dogs as they greet all strangers as friends. They simply weren’t bred to protect, but rather pull. If you are looking for a protective watch dog you should probably look elsewhere.

Please check out some videos below to watch them in action:
Very interesting facts:

Howling:

Pulling a sled:

If you think this is a breed that interests you, we highly recommend that you reach out to a local rescue. But if you do decide to look at breeders please check out our links to reputable breeders.

History:
Due to it’s appearance, many people think the Siberian Husky is a dog-wolf hybrid, but it is not. The husky can be traced back about half a million years ago to the Chukchi people, in Siberia. He was of course a working dog who pulled heavy sleds over long distances. The tribe’s typically lived inland and had to travel to the sea to hunt. The dogs were vital in getting the walrus meat back to the rest of the tribe.
They were brought to Alaska in the early 1900s to compete in long-distance races, notably the All-Alaska Sweepstakes. They became well known for their sledding capabilities and began to be used to deliver mail as well as race.
In 1925, there was a diphtheria epidemic in Nome, Alaska in the middle of winter. Antitoxin was needed desperately. A long-range relay of about 20 mushers brought the antitoxin from Anchorage to Nome in six days, nearly 700 miles in temperatures that hovered around 40 degrees below zero. The run brought fame to the breed. This is where the Iditarod sled dog race originated. This race is duplicated every year.
The Husky was used on the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions, as well as in the U.S. Army’s arctic search-and-rescue efforts during World War II. They also performed courageously in the Army during World War II under the Air Transport Command’s Arctic Search and Rescue Unit.

Size and Weight
20 to 24 inches
35 pounds to 60 pounds.

Personality
The Siberian Husky is not a one-person dog the way, say the German Shepherd is. They are also not a very good guard dog. They don’t have much of a concept of protecting you. They are really a friendly and gentle dog who is intelligent, eager, and has a sense of humor. This is a dog who will never let you take life too seriously.
You really need to understand this breed before you make the choice of getting one. They live life based on thousands of years of instinct. They have always dug in order to make a place to sleep and for shelter and a place to hide things.. They don’t dig to be annoying. However, be ready that they will probably dig if left unaccompanied. He doesn’t dig to be annoying, he digs for shelter and a place to hide and bury things.
The Siberian doesn’t necessarily need a huge yard or a lot of space to live in, but he does need adequate exercise. By adequate exercise, I mean at least one hour every day of jogging or walking and fetching. One hour every day! To really make him happy, harness his natural abilities and teach him to pull a sled, wagon, or cart. Everyone wants to express what their genes want them to do. In an ideal world, you will teach him to Skijor and pull you. This would make him very happy. It is always a good idea to check with your vet before starting any new exercise program with your dog.
A Husky is not the easiest dog in the world to train. You probably better keep a laid back and easy going attitude if you want to stay sane with this as your pet.
They are known for being quite the escape artist and don’t like to feel cooped up. Make sure to always inspect their area and see if they are trying to bolt!
They don’t bark a lot, but they do howl. A happy dog is one with a job and the Siberian is no different. Get him pulling things and having a purpose and he will be happy.

Health
The same as all people have different genetics, all dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems. We really recommend that you look into your local rescue. But if you do choose to go with a breeder, please look for a good Breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. This clearing should come from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA)
Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). .
The Siberian can be susceptible to hip dysplasia, not great for a dog that wants to pull.
Hip Dysplasia: The hip joint is composed of the ball and the socket. The development of hip dysplasia is determined by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors, though there is a complicated pattern of inheritance for this disorder, with multiple genes involved. Hip dysplasia is the failure of the hip joints to develop normally (known as malformation), gradually deteriorating and leading to loss of function of the hip joints.Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred. Ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and found to be free of problems.
Siberians can also be affected by eye problems including juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy.
Not all of these conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it can be hard to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible. Most dogs that come from a rescue won’t have this type of paperwork but should really be considered prior to looking into breeders. One of the most common ailments is obesity, of all things. This is common in all dogs nowadays. We like to feed our pets! This is really bad for them and very hard on their joints. Exercise your dog and keep them at a healthy weight.

Siberian Husky Care:
The Siberian was bred to withstand very cold temperatures, but has only a medium-length double coat. The soft, dense undercoat is topped with straight guard hairs that lie smooth. He will shed, shed, shed, and shed some more. He sheds consistently throughout the year; but once or twice a year he really lets it go. During this period you may feel that it is snowing gray and white hair. You really need to plan on brushing him a couple of times a week, at the least. Plan on bathing him as often as you think he needs it, but not too much as it can dry out their skin.
Trim their nails as needed, and brush his teeth regularly or give him a bone that will help keep his teeth fresh.
Siberian Husky Children And Other Pets
Most Siberian Husky’s will be just fine with kids. Especially if they are properly socialized as a Puppy. They are not overly protective and should mingle well.
We all know that it is still a dog and must be treated with respect and carefully observed in new social settings. Not all dogs will be nice to children and other pets!
Just like people, they have their own personalities. Some will get along fine with new family members, both people and pets, and others not so well. Be sure to slowly socialize your Siberian Husky and know his personality in all social settings.

Siberian Husky Colors:
Here are the most known Husky Colors:
White Husky
Red Husky
Saddleback Husky
Sable Husky
Agouti Husky
Copper Husky
Silver and White Husky
Wolf Grey Husky
Black Husky
Black and White Husky
Piebald Husky
Splash Coat Husky

Siberian Husky Mixes:
There are a lot of mixed breed Siberian Huskys out there. Such as the German Shepherd Siberian Husky Mix. Please check out the following pages if you are interested in seeing more information on these mixes:
German Shepherd Husky Mix
Siberian Husky Pomeranian Mix, Pomsky
The Pomsky has become a rather popular breed. Here is some more information:
Pomsky Puppies for Sale
Pomsky Puppies
Pomsky Breeders
Rescue Groups and Breeders:
Please check your local rescue group if you are looking for a new pet. There are plenty of loving pets out there who need a home:
Forever Husky
Raven’s Husky Rescue
There are many more links that can be found by searching in your local area.
Here is a list of reputable breeders and puppies for sale:
Siberian Husky Breeders
Siberian Husky Puppies for Sale

Read more

Labrador Retriever

Labrador Retriever

The Labrador Retriever is currently the most popular
Dog Breed
in America. They were bred to be a useful working dog as well as a friendly companion. Originally, they were bred to be a fisherman’s helper. They hauled nets, fetched ropes, and retrieved fish from the chilly North Atlantic. They originally hail from Newfoundland. These days the Lab continues to
work as a retriever for hunters, seeing eye dog, search and rescue dog, as well as many other tasks.

Here are some links to some pages that you might be interested in on the puppy-pictures site:

Labrador Retriever Puppies

Labrador Retriever Breeders

Labrador Retriever Puppies for Sale

Pitbull Lab Mix

Hound Lab Mix

German Shepherd Lab MIx

Shar Pei Lab Mix
Jack Russell Lab Mix

Labrador Retriever Overview

The Lab is the number one Dog Breed registered with the American Kennel Club in the United States. They are extremely inviting and friendly dogs. The lab was built to work and be by man’s side all day long. They shed a lot, but they have an easy coat to maintain.
The breed originated off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada on the island of Newfoundland. We will talk more about their history in the sections below. They were bred to help the local fishermen: they hauled nets, fetched ropes, and retrieved fish that had escaped the nets. They were also great companions to take home in the evening.
Their sweet, loving nature make them great therapy dogs. Their strong nose makes them great search and rescue dogs. They were also bred to retrieve downed fowl while hunting as well as retrieve the fishermen’s nets, etc. They are excellent swimmers.
They are extremely sweet, inviting dogs, so please don’t get one as a watchdog. They are likely to disappoint at this task. They are greeters and not fighters and are the kind of dog you want to welcome people into your home.
Please check out some videos below to watch them in action:


Labrador Retriever Highlights:

Labrador Retrievers like to eat and will get overweight very quickly if they are overfed. They aren’t going to cut themselves off, so make sure you limit how much you are feeding them and what they are receiving. They were bred for physically demanding jobs, much like the German Shepherd . They need at least 30 to 60 minutes of exercise a day. Long walks and throwing frisbee or a ball are ideal. If you don’t have the time to devote to this kind of activity I suggest that you look else where for something that might better suit your lifestyle. They were bred to swim for long periods in cold water, they are used to getting a good daily workout.
They are an intelligent dog that is easy to train, but they still need to be trained and worked with nevertheless. An active dog with a job and a sense of purpose is a happy dog. Being that this is such a popular dog, there are a lot of people out there who want to breed them just to make a quick buck and not necessarily enhance the breed. We really recommend that you check with a local rescue, but if you are going to go with a breeder, please look into a reputable one here. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Some breeders go out of their way to breed and produce puppies that work or are ready for the show ring. Others for more of a pet, please make sure you do you research in all facets of this.

History:
The Labrador originally comes from the island of Newfoundland, off the coast of Canada. Beginning in the 1700s, labs and their early ancestors served as companions and helpers to the local fishermen.
During the day, the dogs worked alongside their owner. They retrieved fish who had escaped hooks and towed in lines. At the end of a long day, they returned home to spend the evening with the fisherman’s family. This explains their good nature and athleticism.
No one really knows for sure, but it is believed that the Lab was interbred with the Newfoundland Dog and other small local water dogs.
Somewhere along the line, some Englishmen took note of their usefulness and good disposition. They decided to import a few Labs to England to serve as retrievers for hunting. The second Earl of Malmesbury was one of the first, and had St. John’s dogs shipped to England sometime around 1830.
It is hard to believe, but somehow Labs, were almost extinct by the 1880s. The Malmesbury family are one of the family’s credited with saving the breed. In Newfoundland, the breed disappeared because of government restrictions and tax laws. Families were allowed to keep no more than one dog, and the females were more highly taxed. Thus girl puppies were culled from litters and the reproduction rate plummeted.
They were recognized as a distinct breed in the early twentieth century by all of the major Kennel Clubs in Europe and the States. Their popularity surged after World War II, they are currently the most popular dog in the U.S., Canada and England.

Size and Weight
Males stand 22 to 24 inches
Females stand 21 to 23 inches.
Females typically range from 55 pounds to 70 pounds.

Males typically range from 65 pounds to 80 pounds.

Personality

The Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular breeds for a reason. They are one of the kindest and sweet natured dogs that exists. They get along with pretty much everyone and are rarely aggressive. They really do need lots of exercise and prefer to have a job to do. A happy Labrador Retriever is one with a job. They don’t prefer to be alone, they like to be with a family member doing active things. Even though they are easy going it is important to socialize them well from a very early age.

Health
They are typically a pretty healthy breed, but they of course do have some issues to be aware of.
As I keep stating, we really recommend that you look into your local rescue. If you do choose to go with a breeder, please look for a good
Breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. This clearing should come from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA)
Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA).
Hip Dysplasia: The hip joint is composed of the ball and the socket. The development of hip dysplasia is determined by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors, though there is a complicated pattern of inheritance for this disorder, with multiple genes involved. Hip dysplasia is the failure of the hip joints to develop normally (known as malformation), gradually deteriorating and leading to loss of function of the hip joints.Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred. Ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and found to be free of problems.
Elbow Dysplasia: Canine elbow dysplasia (ED) is a disease of the elbows of dogs caused by growth disturbances in the elbow joint. There are a number of theories as to the exact cause of the disease that include defects in cartilage growth, trauma, genetics, exercise, diet and so on. It is likely that a combination of these factors leads to a mismatch of growth between the two bones in the fore leg located between the elbow and the wrist (radius and ulna). If the radius grows more slowly than the ulna it becomes shorter leading to increased pressure on the medial coronoid process of the ulna.
Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus: Gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV), also known as twisted stomach or gastric torsion, is a medical condition in which the stomach becomes overstretched and rotated by excessive gas content. The word bloat is often used as a general term to mean gas distension without stomach torsion (a normal change after eating), or to refer to GDV.
GDV is a life-threatening condition in dogs that requires prompt treatment. It is common in certain dog breeds; deep-chested breeds are especially at risk. Mortality rates in dogs range from 10 to 60 percent, even with treatment. With surgery, the mortality rate is 15 to 33 percent.
Myopathy: This condition affects the muscles and nervous system. The first signs are seen as early as six weeks and typically by seven months of age. The initial symptoms are they are tired and stiff when they walk or trot. He may collapse after exercise. In time, the muscles atrophy and the dog can barely stand or walk. There is no treatment and dogs with myopathy should not be bred because it is considered a heritable disease. It is very important to check the dog you are getting!
Tricuspid Valve Dysplasia (TVD): This is a malformation of the tricuspid valve on the right side of the heart. It can be mild or severe and is detected by ultrasound. This is a congenital heart defect that is increasing in prevalence in this breed.

Care:
If you are thinking about getting a Labrador Retriever, you need to remember that they were originally bred to work all day. Labrador Retrievers were not meant to sit still. They need a lot of daily exercise. This should preferably be long walks, hikes or chasing the ball. Swimming is ideal as it is much easier on their joints, but we recognize this is not as feasible at times.
This exercise not only allows him to exercise his body, but also his mind. If left alone unexercised you might start getting the undesirable actions such as barking and chewing.

Feeding:
Please note that is almost impossible to give one feeding advice online without seeing their dog. Each dog is an individual, just like a person, and has different dietary requirements. If your dog looks too heavy, it probably is and you should cut back on their diet. If you can see his ribs it is probably too thin, but if you can feel his ribs underneath a layer of muscle it is probably fine.
Overfeeding any dog is not a good idea as that can really exacerbate health problems such as elbow and hip dysplasia.
I recommend looking into different diets, such as a Raw Food Diet.

Coat and Grooming:
The Labrador Retriever was originally bred to work in harsh climates. They have a short, thick, straight topcoat, and a soft, weather-resistant undercoat. The two-layer coat protects him from the cold and wet, this of course helps them as a retriever for hunters and in the cold, frigid water. The coat of the Labrador Retriever is very easy to brush and groom, but they also shed A LOT! If you are not someone who wants to vacuum a lot and have hair all over your house, this is probably not a good match.
Brushing your dog a few times a week really helps cut down on the hair that will be left in the house. You should also be prepared to bathe your Labrador Retriever once a week or so. But don’t overdo it as it can strip its hair of essential oils.
The nails need to be trimmed once a month, and the ears checked once a week for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that can indicate an infection, then wiped out weekly with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to prevent problems.
You can either brush their teeth or get them a good, safe dog bone to chew on that will help reduce tartar and build-up on their teeth.

Children And Other Pets
The Lab is pretty much the ideal dog for kids and other pets. I couldn’t imagine you going wrong with this breed. Just like people, they have their own personalities. Some will get along fine with new family members, both people and pets, and others not so well. Be sure to slowly socialize your Labrador Retriever and know his personality in all social settings.

Labrador Retriever Mixes:
There are a lot of mixed breed Labrador Retrievers out there. Such as the Siberian Husky Labrador Retriever Mix. Please check out the following pages if you are interested in seeing more information on these mixes:
Pitbull Lab Mix

Hound Lab Mix

German Shepherd Lab MIx

Shar Pei Lab Mix
Jack Russell Lab Mix

Rescue Groups and Breeders:
Please check your local rescue group if you are looking for a new pet. There are plenty of loving pets out there who need a home:
Lab Rescue
Lucky Labs Rescue
Lab Rescue of North Carolina
Here is a list of reputable breeders and puppies for sale:
Labrador Retriever Breeders
Labrador Retriever Puppies for Sale

Read more

 

 


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